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How is the Danish workplace culture?

It is difficult to say anything definite about the Danish workplace culture, but here you can find some information and links.

Informal

Generally, the Danish workplace culture is characterized by being quite informal. There is no dress code, and people talk informally to each other.

You do not use “Sir” and “Ms”, but you use first names with all colleagues, from trainees to managers and superiors.

Your colleagues will also use your first name, and people say 'du' (the informal 'you') when they address each other. However, you might be more formal in mail correspondence.
 

Equality

The Danish workplace culture is also characterized by being quite democratic and equal. The Danes care about equal rights, and this is reflected on the workplace.
 

Independence

In a Danish workplace you are expected to work independently and to show initiative. Often the work culture is open, and your manager might not check up on your work or give you new tasks.

You are expected to work things out for yourself and work independently with your tasks, but you can always discuss matters with your colleagues and ask your manager for advice.

You will often get your own areas of responsibility and have relatively high independence at your workplace.
 

Open dialogue

Most companies have a flat structure and a level hierarchy, where there is a short distance between managers and workers.

There will often be room for everyone to contribute and to express their opinions and suggestions.

Even though it is the manager, who makes the decisions at the end of the day, you will often find that the manager wants to talk to the employees and let them voice their opinions.
 

Social activities in the workplace

In Denmark there are often many social activities in the workplace. Many companies have recurring social events, and everybody is invited. This can be events like Christmas party, summer picnic, cake on Fridays etc.

Almost everybody participates in these events.

Often you celebrate your birthday by bringing cake for your colleagues, and some places the employees eat breakfast together on Fridays.

Learn more about the Danish workplace culture at Work in Denmark.
 

Courses in Danish workplace culture

At the free job search courses arranged by the City of Copenhagen and Work in Denmark the participants will be taught about Danish workplace culture:

First Job Copenhagen (only for residents of the City of Copenhagen).

Work in Denmark.

Expat in Denmark.

You can also learn about Danish workplace culture by being matched with a Career Host through the Copenhagen Host Program (only for residents of the City of Copenhagen). Go to What is Copenhagen Host Program?

International House does also occasionally organize events on Danish workplace culture.